Monday, June 19, 2017

Windfall by Jennifer E. Smith

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Publication date: 2017
Publisher: Delacorte Press
Pages: 300
My rating: 3 stars
Ages: 15+

Alice doesn't believe in luck; at least, not good luck. So when she buys her friend Teddy a lottery ticket as a joke for his birthday, she doesn't expect anything to come of it. But the next day, Teddy becomes the youngest winner of the lottery ever. Alice is scared what this change will do to her best friend--who she has been in love with for years.

I usually love Smith's characters; however, I really didn't like Teddy. Even at the end. He had ignored and brushed off Alice so many times, got mad at her for sharing her opinion, and never seemed to try to see things from her side. Then he would get jealous and childish when she seemed interested in another person. Even at the end of book, I still just couldn't find myself liking him.

That said, I did like the book and the concept of it. Who hasn't thought what they would do if they won the lottery? How would life change or not change? How would it affect your friends and family? Though, really, the story was more about Alice growing and learning about family and friendship than Teddy winning the lottery. And the writing was spot on.

There is some mild language, but no sex.

*I do not receive compensation from Amazon.

Monday, June 12, 2017

The Lost Kingdom of Bamarre by Gail Carson Levine

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Publication date: 2017
Publisher: Harper Collins
Pages: 400
My rating: 3.5 stars
Ages: 10+

Peregrine was raised thinking she was a Lakti--a member of the ruling class. Then a fairy comes to her and tells her that she is a Bamarre, the oppressed people who were conquered by the Lakti generations ago. Perry must make the decision to continue to live as a Lakti or to embrace being a Bamarre to save her people.

This is a prequel to Levine's The Two Princesses of Bamarre, telling the background of the freedom of the Bamarre that is referenced. To be honest, it's been a long time since I read Two Princesses, but this book stood on it's own. I just wanted to pick up on the Easter eggs and allusions.

Levine has been one of my favorite authors since I was a kid, so I was excited when a new book came out. This has shades of multiple fairy tales and stories, without being tooI don't know if this is her best book, but it was exciting and a good read, especially if you are a fan.

There is no language or sex.

*I do not receive compensation from Amazon.

Monday, June 5, 2017

The Names They Gave Us by Emery Lord

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Publication date: 2017
Publisher: Bloomsbury
Pages: 388
My rating: 4 stars
Ages: 16+

Lucy in secure in her life as a Pastor's Kid, relying on her faith and her relationship with her family to guide her life. But when her mom is diagnosed with cancer, Lucy's faith fails her and she starts pushing back against the things she was taught. Instead of helping with her parents' church camp over the summer, Lucy becomes a counselor at the "hippie" camp. It's there that she learns about who she really is and what it means to love and be loved.

I just really love Lord's writing. It's so approachable and easy to read, but with a depth that usually comes from much more complicated writing. I like the view of Lucy's crisis of faith--I think it's something that a lot of people go through. She still held onto the things she was taught, and still wanted to be faithful, but was angry at God.

There comes a time in every teenager's life that they need to learn for themselves and stop relying on their parents to tell them how they should be. And there comes a time when a child learns more about their parents as people, with histories and faults. Lucy learning these things and growing as a person and a friend was natural.

Also, I cried several times.

There is some swearing (about four f-words) and mention of sex.

*I do not receive compensation from Amazon.

Monday, May 29, 2017

Goodbye Days by Jeff Zentmer

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Publication date: 2017
Publisher: Crown
Pages: 399
My rating: 3.5
Ages: 16+

Not only did Carver lose all three of his friends at once, but he has to live with the guilt of knowing he caused their deaths. Not on purpose, but caused all the same. With school starting, Carver isn't sure how to face everyone without his friends. Battling crippling guilt, Carver has to come to terms with what happened, even while being blamed by those around him.

I didn't mean for my last two reviews to be about grief and death, but sometimes these things just happen. However, this is a completely different look at grief and guilt than was in Letters to the Lost. This time, something that Carver did directly attributed to the accident that killed his friends, and it's something he has to live with. What I think is important though, is that in grieving, we all start thinking of things we could have done different and we all experience that guilt and need to come to terms with living while others are gone.

This book also deals with panic attacks, being blamed, and friendship. It's not a deeply depressing book, but it does deal with serious subjects.

There is some language and sexual talk.

*I received this book from Blogging for Books for this review.

Monday, May 22, 2017

Letters to the Lost by Brigid Kemmerer

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Publication date: 2017
Publisher: Bloomsbury
Pages: 388
My rating: 4 stars
Ages: 15+

Juliet spends her free time in the cemetery, writing letters to her mother. Declan is likely to be voted "most likely to end up in jail." He's serving community service when he finds a letter left on a grave. When he decides to respond to it, he starts a relationship with an unknown person who seems to understand him better than any other person. But when he learns that the person he's been writing is Juliet, he wonders if he can continue to share with her.

I loved this book--I could barely stand to put it down. While it does deal with heavy topics such as grief and guilt and judging by appearances, it didn't feel heavy even while addressing them in a good way.

It took a little while for me to realize that when the chapter started with a letter from one character, it meant the chapter would be in the other character's POV. I think I would have liked a more obvious clue than that.

The secondary characters were also interesting and well developed, to the point where I believed that they had a life outside of reacting to the main characters' drama.

No sex (thought mention of it and mention of nudity) and only mild language.

*I do not receive compensation from Amazon.

Monday, May 15, 2017

Duels and Deception by Cindy Anstey

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Publication date: 2017
Publisher: Swoon Reads
Pages: 345
My rating: 3.5 stars
Ages: 14+

Lydia is occupied with planning her eighteenth party, keeping her uncle from ruining the estate, and getting engaged to the man her father chose before his death. Things start to change with Robert Newton appears. Then they are both kidnapped, which connects them in a new and complicated way. But this just beginning of a mystery that could put both Lydia and Robert in danger.

This was such a fun book, especially for fans of Regency England. Lydia is a strong willed female, who is still feminine but aware of her responsibilities. Robert is a hard working third son with an admirable sense of right and wrong.

I also think that this is a great way to introduce young readers to the world of Jane Austen and the writing of Georgette Heyer. It introduces social mores, culture, and vocabulary in a easy way to for modern readers to understand and will hopefully lead them reading the classics.

No language or sex.

*I do not receive compensation from Amazon.

Monday, May 8, 2017

The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl: Squirrel Meets World by Shannon Hale and Dean Hale

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Publication date: 2017
Publisher: Marvel Press
Pages: 336
My rating: 4 stars
Ages: 10+

Doreen Green has just moved to New Jersey and ready to make new friends, just like any other 14 year old. However, Doreen isn't your run-of-the-mill teenager--she has a giant squirrel tail. She usually hides it, but when some trouble starts going down in her neighborhood, she takes action. Now, she's Squirrel Girl! Saving babies and befriending squirrels!

Having never heard of Squirrel Girl before it was announced that the Hales were going to write the novel, I went into this with no expectations. I was very pleasantly surprised! It was fun, with great little jokes peppered throughout (some that maybe kids wouldn't get as they are plays on words). I especially liked Doreen's optimism and kindness, even as she's fighting the villain.

I would say that this is more of a "middle grade" book than young adult. Also, I feel that Doreen acts younger than her age. Granted, it's been a few years since I was 14, but I don't quite remember it the way it's portrayed in the book. Of course, I try to block out a lot of my teen years, so it's completely possible.

Anyway. Great book for any one who likes superheros. No language or sex.

*I do not receive compensation from Amazon.

Tuesday, May 2, 2017

The Inkblots by Damion Searls

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Publication date: 2017
Publisher: Crown Publishing
Pages: 416
My rating: 3.5 stars
Ages: 18+

Seen as a stereotype of quackery, the Rorschach test has long been misunderstood, almost since the beginning. But it is more than just random pictures. The test consists of 10 carefully curated inkblots, with meanings derived from multiple factors. Only those trained to use the test (usually in conjunction with other psychological tests) can make sense out of the answers.

I need to be honest. I didn't finish this book. Not because I didn't want to, or because it wasn't interesting, but because of life. Just after starting this book, I started grad school and the combination of the technicalities in the book and the technical things I was reading for my classes, it was difficult to want to read this.

However, the third of the book I did read was very interesting. I find psychology fascinating, so learning the little I did about the test and how it works was cool. The book starts with a modern day example of using the test and how patients react differently to the inkblot test than they do to other psychological tests.

Great for those interested in the history of psychology.

No swearing or sex.

*I received this book from Blogging for Books for this review.

Monday, May 1, 2017

Frogkisser! by Garth Nix

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Publication date: 2017
Publisher: Scholastic Press
Pages: 372
My rating: 3.5 stars
Ages: 13+

All Princess Anya wants to do is read books and become a sorcerer. But then a prince who was courting her sister is turned into a frog by her evil Stepstepfather, and to turn him back she must embark on a quest. What starts out as a simple quest turns into something much bigger as Anya collects more companions along the way.

Those familiar with Nix's previous books will find the same kind of rich world building in Frogkisser. But, as the exclamation point may hint at, it's not as serious as the the Old Kingdom books. Because of this, this is a fun book for everyone, especially younger kids with a higher reading level.

Frogkisser takes some familiar fairy tales and creatures and twists and turns them around, making sure that the reader is pleasantly surprised at every turn. There is also the inclusion of characters like the Gerald the Heralds that are a lot of fun to read.

There is no language or sex.

*I do not receive compensation from Amazon.

Monday, April 24, 2017

Chinese Cinderella: The True Story of an Unwanted Daughter by Adeline Yen Mah

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Publication date: 1999; 2010 (this edition)
Publisher: Ember
Pages: 203
My rating: 3 stars
Ages: 12+

Blamed with her mother's death, Adeline Yen was treated as the lowest of the low in her family. Left at boarding school and forgotten, she was able to flee to Hong Kong just ahead of the communists. Trying to prove herself to her family and schoolmates, Adeline works hard to get good grades and earn a place in the world and her family.

This gives an interesting look at pre-communist China from the view of a child. There was also a lot about the Chinese written language and how it work (which was really fascinating).

It was a little juvenile, but that just made it easy to understand and more approachable for the audience that I believe Mah was writing for. The children who are ignored or blamed for things they had no choice in.

It was sad, but optimistic. Mah didn't seem to let the situations of her childhood negatively affect her. Instead, she worked hard and remained optimistic. This is probably because she had at least one adult who believed in her.

No language or sex.

*I do not receive compensation from Amazon.

Monday, April 17, 2017

The Anatomical Shape of a Heart by Jenn Bennett

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Publication date: 2015
Publisher: Feiwel and Friends
Pages: 291
My rating: 3 stars
Ages: 17+

Beatrix wants to be the next great anatomical artist and to do that she wants to do what da Vinci did and study real bodies. Jack is charming, ridiculously handsome, and . . . maybe a criminal. A chance meeting turns into something mutually beneficial, and then even more. But each has baggage that could interfere with their newfound romance. Can the heart actually break?

This was a somewhat standard teen romance novel. The writing was good, nothing was really off, but I can't say that it was something that stuck around with me after reading it, but it was entertaining to read and had interesting characters and intriguing conflict.

I had never thought about the fact that all those drawings in science textbooks were the hard work of someone studying the human body intensely and thoroughly.

The approach to mental illness was good.

There was some hard swearing and some sex as well as sex talk.

*I do not receive compensation from Amazon.

Monday, April 10, 2017

A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness, illust. by Jim Kay

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Publication date: 2011
Publisher: Candlewick Press
Pages: 205
My rating: 3.5 stars
Ages: 11+
Awards: Carnegie Medal; Kate Greenaway Medal

One night, after midnight, a monster comes walking. It's not the monster from Conor's nightmares, so Conor isn't frightened. The monster tells Conor three stories in exchange for Conor's truth. But Conor doesn't know what that is and isn't sure he's willing to share.

I think what I liked most about this book is the simple way that it told truths. Villains aren't all bad, heroes aren't always good, and sometimes people leave you. (And now we shall have a sing along to "No One is Alone" from Into the Woods . . .) Ness presents everything in a way that I feel like younger kids would find it approachable.

Ness also includes the themes of acceptance, feeling emotions, and being there for others.

Kay's illustrations were mesmerizing. They showed movement and chaos, like what Conor must be feeling, but could also show stillness and peace. There was an orderliness to the chaos, and I probably could have continued to look at them for a long time to really get the feel of them.

*I do not receive compensation from Amazon.

Monday, April 3, 2017

The Heartbreakers by Ali Novak

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Publication date: 2015
Publisher: Sourcebooks
Pages: 329
My rating: 3
stars
Ages: 15+

When Stella meets a cute guy in Starbucks, she doesn't realize that he's the lead singer of the Heartbreakers--the biggest boy group in the world. With her sister sick, Stella doesn't have time to worry about Oliver Perry, especially since he's so famous. But when an opportunity comes to work with the band, Stella isn't sure if she can turn it down. With business and pleasure mixing, along with worry over her sister, Stella is in for an adventure of a lifetime.

This is a nice, fun light read that also deals with some heavier subjects like family, friends, illness, and taking chances. It's nice when something that could just be another teen romance, feeding into the adolescent fantasy of meeting someone famous, is actually a bit more complex and fleshed out.

Both Stella and Oliver are dealing with fears and insecurities that I think a lot of teens (and adults) are familiar with. And throughout the course of the book, they make progress, with a few setbacks, on overcoming them, which makes for good character growth.

There was some hard language and some mild sexual talk.

*I do not receive compensation from Amazon.

Sunday, April 2, 2017

All These Wonders ed. by Catherine Burns

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Publication date: 2017
Publisher: Crown Archetype
Pages: 327
My rating: 5 stars
Ages: 16+

Seeing Pluto for the first time. Surviving a concentration camp. Sharing custody of a dog. Summer camp. Each person has a story to tell, a story to share, about facing the unknown. The Moth has collected these stories into one volume, to share with the world.

I love these slice of life stories. They could be funny, sweet, sad, or happy. Each person shares something from their life that we can all identify with, even if we've never worked with a space craft or was a spy in WWII or been a refugee. But we've all lived life, experiencing new things, encountering death and birth, living through all those moments that make life what it is.

Because these are transcripts of oral stories, the voice of the person is kept intact, in a way that written stories seem to lose. I kept telling my family about certain stories I had read, even reading one out loud in it's entirety to my mom as she made dinner one night ("A Phone Call" from Auburn Sandstrom). Others I just summarized, though I'm sure really poorly.

Well worth reading. These are the things that help us see that we are a human family, connected by the things that are universal.

Some hard language and references to sex.

*I received this book from Blogging for Books for this review.

Monday, March 27, 2017

A Season of Daring Greatly by Ellen Emerson White

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Publication date: 2017
Publisher: Greenwillow Books
Pages: 420
My rating: 2 stars
Ages: 13+

Jill Cafferty has made history as the first woman to be drafted onto a MLB team. That was the easy part. Now she has to deal with her new found stardom, her teammates, and the haters that come with it. Jill isn't sure if she can handle it, or if baseball is worth it.

This book had such great potential. The story of someone making history. . . it could have been such an amazing story. However, right off the bat, I was distracted.

The editing wasn't up to par. Usually I dismiss this as me just being an editor, but it was so prevalent, on every single page, that I just can't this time. Sentence structure, grammar, punctuation, chapter breaks . . . all of it together made it difficult to get into the story.

When I did try to ignore the editing, I started to notice little things about the writing. So much of the book was internal for Jill, but it was written in the third person. Changing it to first person would have made it much more approachable and bring the reader closer to Jill. Then we could have focused more on the difficulties and her insecurities in a better and deeper way. There were also parts of the book that were too long, which, if shortened, would have allowed for other parts to be longer or more fleshed out.

There was some language and sexual discussion.

*I do not receive compensation from Amazon.

Monday, March 20, 2017

Wintersong by S. Jae-Jones

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Publication date: 2016
Publisher: Thomas Dunne Books
Pages: 436
My rating: 3 stars
Ages: 16+

As a child, Liesl used to pretend to play with the Goblin King. Now she's grown and trying to give her brother the chance she will never have and those games have become hazy memories. Then Liesl's sister, Kathe, is taken Underground and Liesl must save her. The Goblin King, Der Erlkonig, is real, just as their play was. Now, Liesl must play his game to save Kathe, and in the process, accept something in herself she had kept hidden.

This book has a hints of The Goblin Market by Christina Rossetti, Labyrinth, and Red Riding Hood. It starts out strong, with interesting characters and dilemmas. Liesl is complex, striving for her family and her brother, but dismissing her sister as safe.

Then about half way through, the story started to drag a little. I felt that the same scene seemed to happen about three times, with Liesl expressing the same thoughts and feelings as she had before. The relationship was hot and cold, more complicated than I think it needed to be. Also, there were a couple of times when the tense changed from past to present, and I couldn't make sense why.

The ending, however, was strong, with a bittersweet feel that was a perfect end.

There was some sex, including one scene that was fairly graphic, and some mild language.

*I do not receive compensation from Amazon. 

Monday, March 13, 2017

Someday, Someday, Maybe by Lauren Graham

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Publication date: 2013
Publisher: Ballantine Books
Pages: 368
My rating: 2.5 stars
Ages: 16+

Franny Banks is on a deadline. She has given herself three years to become a working actor in New York. With only six months left, she's starting to despair that it's every going to happen. Through odd jobs, strange auditions, and relationships, Franny discovers what is most important to her and what she wants from her career.

For a debut novel, this is good. However (there's always a however, isn't there?), I felt that the story was a little predictable. From the beginning, I knew exactly where it was going to go and what was going to happen.

I missed Graham's innate humor, which is so obvious in her interviews and memoirs. Instead, I was left with a somewhat flat character who just let life drag her along, no matter how she felt about it. Franny never seemed to take action or responsibility. I understand--sometimes I ignore my mail for a couple of days because I just don't want to deal with it--but Franny seemed to still be acting like a 19 year old college student.

I did like that Franny was mystified by show business when it came to everything but acting. And in the end, she made the right choices.

There was some mild language and sexual situations.

*I do not receive compensation from Amazon.

Saturday, March 11, 2017

Roanoke Girls by Amy Engel

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Publication date: 2017
Publisher: Crown
Pages: 274
My rating: 1 stars
Ages: 18+

At fifteen, Lane's mother commits suicide. That means Lane is shipped off to Kansas to live with the grandparents she has never met. There she becomes part of the legacy of the "Roanoke Girls." But there is more to that legacy than she knows and once she discovers the secret, she runs. Eleven years later, Lane is drawn back to Roanoke when her cousin goes missing. Lane is forced to face the past she had left behind.

This was well written and intriguing. However, I couldn't finish reading it, though I read 105 pages. The topic was so perverse that every time I read it, I felt sick.

I don't usually give away spoilers in my reviews, but I feel that for the sake of readers, I should. This deals with incest. Serial incest. A man who not only sleeps with his sister, but his daughters and granddaughter. A man who uses his charm to convince impressionable young girls who look to him as an authority figure to sleep with him, that there isn't anything wrong. And a woman who turns an eye to it. Perhaps he gets his comeuppance in the end, but I couldn't wade through it to see.

There was also a lot of language.

*I received this book from Blogging for Books for this review.

Monday, March 6, 2017

Ready Player One by Ernest Cline

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Publication date: 2011
Publisher: Crown Publishers
Pages: 372
My rating: 3.5 stars
Ages: 16+

In the year 2044, Wade (aka Parzival) is one of many "gunters"--those searching for the three keys left on the Oasis after the founder's death. Winning means total control of the Oasis and riches beyond imagination. When Wade becomes the first person to find a key, he has to race against the other gunters and the nefarious IOI to find the last three keys.

This is not the kind of book that I would normally pick up for myself. I'm not a gamer or really understand gaming. But it was assigned for a new book club that I just joined, so I got it from the library and read it.

I was pleasantly surprised! It was an interesting futuristic novel, set mostly in an online world. I don't like the idea of people spending all their time in a virtual reality, but since the real world had become depressing, I guess it kind of makes sense. There were times when I forgot that the virtual world wasn't the real one, which I think is exactly what was supposed to happen.

At times, the 80s references seemed a little out of control. It also wasn't a perfect book. But it's interesting and easy to read.

There was some language.

*I do not receive compensation from Amazon.

Monday, February 27, 2017

The Fangirl's Guide to the Galaxy by Sam Maggs

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Publication date: 2015
Publisher: Quirk Books
Pages: 207
My rating: 3.5 stars
Ages: 15+

What does it mean to be a "fangirl"? How do you defend yourself as a geek? What is the most important things to know about cons? This and so much more are discussed in Maggs's guide for fangirls of all kinds.

This was a lot of fun to read. Maggs tries to be inclusive, which is a difficult thing to do, so I don't think I can fault the guide for not including some things that I believed should have been included or approached differently. People from different backgrounds will always have different ideas and approaches, which I think Maggs did a good job at acknowledging, especially with the interviews she conducted with famous geek girls.

My favorite parts was probably the "One of Us" chapter, the chapter on surviving conventions, and the lists of resources and fandoms of all kinds.

There were some editing/design things that made me cringe, as an editor, but they weren't necessarily wrong more than that they went against what I had been taught.

There is some mild language and references to sex.

*I do not receive compensation from Amazon.

Monday, February 20, 2017

Talking As Fast As I Can by Lauren Graham

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Publication date: 2016
Publisher: Ballantine Books
Pages: 205
My rating: 4 stars
Ages: 14+

From auditioning with her butt to the Gilmore Girls revival, Lauren Graham shares the struggles and successes of her acting career. Her humor and honesty is as refreshing as the first smell of snow in Stars Hollow.

Graham writes the way she speaks, which I love. I love reading something and being able to hear in my head how the person would say it.

There was something refreshing about Graham's book, something different than the other celebrity memoir I've read. I think it was because Graham seemed to see everything in a positive light, or at least wrote of it positively. She also seemed to have a relatively normal life. I think we sometimes think that creative people are tortured eccentrics with drug and alcohol problems, so it's nice to read about someone from a loving family with relatively few problems.

It was also fun to hear her thoughts on the original Gilmore Girls series and the filming of the revival.

Very mild language.

*I do not receive compensation from Amazon.

Monday, February 13, 2017

Writing Magic: Creating Stories that Fly by Gail Carson Levine

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Publication date: 2006
Publisher: Harper
Pages: 161
My rating: 4 stars
Ages: 12+

Best-selling author and Newbery Award winner Gail Carson Levine gives advice and writing techniques that work. From how to create a character to working through writer's block, she walks the beginner writer through each step of the process. Each topic has a writing activity to help the reader put what they just learned into action.

I'm a huge Levine fan, so getting this book was kind of a given. What I liked about this book is that each chapter was short and to the point, making it a lot more approachable than some other books. This makes it particularly good for young writers who are interested in getting better at writing.

I do have to admit, I didn't do any of the writing activities. I was usually reading the book during lunch at work or in bed before going to sleep, so I wasn't really interested in doing them. However, just reading through it is something that I think will help me in my writing.

*I do not receive compensation from Amazon.

Monday, February 6, 2017

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story by Alexander Freed

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Publication date: 2016
Publisher: Del Ray
Pages: 322
My rating: 3.5 stars
Ages: 13+

It's been nearly twenty years since the Empire took power over the universe. The Rebel Alliance has heard rumors of a new powerful weapon the Empire is building, but has been unable to find any proof. Jyn Erso has spent most of her life fighting, with no real loyalty to anyone or any side. Cassian Andor is an intelligence agent working for the Alliance. The two are thrown together on a task to learn more about the Empire's new weapon, putting them, and the Alliance, in danger as they travel across the galaxy, creating a rag tag group who is willing to do anything to hurt the Empire.

After seeing the movie, I couldn't stop thinking about it. I found out by looking things up on the Internet that the novelization included more information on each character and scenes that didn't make it into the movie. I immediately bought the book and anxiously waited for it to arrive.

I don't usually read novelizations, because they are basically everything you see on the screen put into print, which rarely makes a good novel. This was a pretty good novelization. Freed was able to take the story and add things to it that, for the most part, felt true to the characters presented on the screen. It provides context for the characters that we don't see in the film, though I think he did Jyn a bit of a disservice. In the film, she had strong opinions and her own moral code and a natural leader. In the book she seemed unsure, unfit for leadership, and without the nuances had made her such a great character in the film.

Several of the nuances from the film were lost, while others were added. There was also a liberal use of italics throughout the book, which were unnecessary and distracting.

In all, good for Star Wars fans, especially those teens who are reluctant readers.

There is no language or sex.

*I do not receive compensation from Amazon.

Monday, January 30, 2017

Everyday Magic by Emily Albright

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Publication date: 2017
Publisher: Merit Books
Pages: 334
My rating: 3 stars
Ages: 15+

Maggie's father expects her to go to UCLA and become an entertainment lawyer. What Maggie wants is to get far away from her famous and abusive father and become a designer. Things seem to be coming up Maggie when she gets into the school of her dreams and meets Preston. But she just can't seem to get out of her father's control, no matter what she tries, and that starts to get in the way of her relationship with Preston.

When I picked up this book I had just finished reading a series of books that involved a lot of crying over deaths of beloved characters, so I needed something light and quick to read. This book fit the bill perfectly. Despite what could be construed as some dark themes (abuse, blackmail, etc.), the book didn't really dwell on the really dark parts.

There were some inconsistencies throughout concerning chronology (one date was called the second, the fourth, and the fifth date between two minor characters). Some of the dialogue was a bit awkward and unnatural sounding. There was some jumping over long periods of time, which sometimes seemed to cut things short or require retroactive telling instead of showing it while it happened.

As it was, the book was a fun read, just because it happened to be what I needed at the time. There was romance, dreams coming true, just some fun escapist fiction for a few minutes.

*I do not receive compensation from Amazon.

Thursday, January 26, 2017

Besties by Leah Reena Goran

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Publication date: 2016
Publisher: Clarkson Potter
Pages: 96
My rating: 3 stars
Ages: 15+

There are friends and then there are besties. A bestie is someone who knows you inside and out, who you have inside jokes with, and who you can trust to be honest.

This is a celebration of besties everywhere. Through colorful illustrations and simple explanations, the book talks about that girl in your life who is basically family.

I don't really feel that this book was groundbreaking in anyway. It's more something that I would expect to see at a Hallmark store or similar places. Mostly, this would be a cute book to buy for your bestie for her birthday. That being said, there were several times when I thought of my own bestie--who I have known for 20 years. There are just certain things in this life that are universal, and the experience of best friends is one of those.

I put the age up where I did because there are some adult themes.

*I received this book from Blogging for Books for this review.
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Monday, January 23, 2017

This is Our Story by Ashley Elston

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Publication date: 2016
Publisher: Hyperion
Pages: 312
My rating: 3.5 stars
Ages: 15+

The River Point Boys are all anyone will talk about, everyone wondering which was the one that shot the gun that killed their friend. Kate is an intern at the DA's office and the attorney she works for just got the case. Kate has her own reasons for finding justice for the boy who was killed and is determined to dig into the case to find out who shot the gun. But things aren't always as they seem, which Kate is about to discover.

I read this book in a day. It was interesting and gripping, with some twists and turns I wasn't expecting (of course, I never expect them). Each character had hidden depths, and interactions between characters were natural and interesting. There were times when Kate didn't do what she should have done, but I remember being a teenager and teenagers don't tend to think things through in the most logical way.

There was something that bothered me; Elston frequently used the phrasing "hands framing her face" (or something similar). It got to the point where I rolled my eyes every time it showed up. Not that the action it was describing was annoying, but that it was only described that way. I wish that she had thought of other ways to portray it (i.e. "he cupped my face in his hands"). It was used often enough (especially near the end of the book) that it became repetitive.

In all, though, it was a good read and a good mystery.

There was some hard language and some sexual talk.

*I do not receive compensation from Amazon.

Monday, January 16, 2017

My Unscripted Life by Lauren Morrill

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Publication date: 2016
Publisher: Delacorte Press
Pages: 276
My rating: 3 stars
Ages: 13+

Dee thought she knew exactly how her summer was going to go, but instead, she's looking forward to a hot Georgia summer with no art school and no best friend. So when a movie starts filming her in her small town, she jumps at the chance to work as a PA on set--though knowing the film would star Milo Ritter was a big incentive too. However, her first meeting with Milo was memorable for all the wrong reasons.

This is the kind of book that you can just curl up with and enjoy. It's decidedly aware of its genre, which is kind of what makes it work.

I like "behind the scenes" things, so I enjoyed the stuff on the movie set, though I'm not exactly sure how accurate it was--my knowledge of film sets being based on cobbled together information that I have gathered from various places. I was a little unsure about a full-length movie being made in three weeks . . . but it has happened, and since it was an indie film . . .

I liked Milo. I thought that his struggle with being famous and having to deal with all that brings was very well put together. Dee was sometimes annoying, sometimes fun, sometimes a little dense; so, a teenager.

Very little language and some mild sexual references, appropriate for teens.

*I do not receive compensation from Amazon.

Friday, January 13, 2017

Holding Up the Universe by Jennifer Niven

More info*
Publication date: 2016
Publisher: Alfred A. Knopf
Pages: 388
My rating: 3.5
Ages: 16+

Both Libby and Jack have things they'd rather not have people know. Libby is returning to school after five years of being housebound and would rather that no one remember that she was once "the fattest teen in America." No one knows that popular guy Jack can't remember the faces of anyone around him, and he's been very careful that no one finds out. When the two of them end up having to spend a lot of time together, they find that they have more in common than they would have ever thought possible.

This book is an amazing example of great writing. Niven seems to really understand teenagers and the things that happen during those completely awkward and uncertain teen years. The teasing, the bullying, the worry about what your peers will think of you. Then there are the relationships between siblings and parents, of all types, and the examples of both good and bad teachers. Then there are the deeper themes of looking past the surface and seeing people for who they really are.

I liked Libby a lot. She was still a bit self conscious about her weight (like everyone), but she was passionate and knew what she wanted. There wasn't anything she was going to let stand in her way to getting the things she wanted. She was also close to her father, which is unique in YA novels, but as someone who had a good relationship with her parents throughout her teen years (and now), I thought it was nice to see.

Jack was kind of . . . rude, but that was mostly because of how he compensated for his face blindness and the people he surrounded himself with. Jack doesn't have anyone in his life that inspires him to be his true self.

There was quite a bit of language and some sexual talk.

*I received this book from Blogging for Books for this review.

Monday, January 9, 2017

Spare and Found Parts by Sarah Maria Griffin

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Publication date: 2016
Publisher: Greenwillow Books
Pages: 306
My rating: 2.5 stars
Ages: 15+

Feeling as if she's always in the shadow of her mother's and father's contributions, Nell isn't sure if she can contribute anything of worth. Then she finds the mannequin hand at the river, she starts imagining making a man who would be exactly what she would need.

My first disappoint was when I realized that it wasn't a Victorian/steampunk novel based on the Tin Man like I thought, but instead a dystopian novel based on Frankenstein. The reasoning behind their society was never really explained, other than that it had something to do with computers. Then there was revelation that it was only their city and the rest of the world had continued on. It was hard to follow and didn't seem to make sense.

The writing was good and descriptive, but there were changes in point of view and verb tense, which seemed to have no real reason behind them. It was especially evident when it changed from third to second person. This was a little jarring.

Nell also seemed moody and anti-social for no reason at all. She shied away from her friends, though she seemed to be popular, and found being touched annoying. There was nothing in her history that seemed to show why she would be that way, making her annoying to read about. It's difficult to read something when you don't like the main character.

There was no language and no sex.

*I do not receive compensation from Amazon.

Monday, January 2, 2017

Where Am I Now? True Stories of Girlhood and Accidental Fame by Mara Wilson

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Publication date: 2016
Publisher: Penguin Books
Pages: 255
My rating: 5 stars
Ages: 16+

Most people know Mara Wilson from when she played the title role in Matilda. In this book of essays, Wilson talks about her childhood as a star, her family, and what it's like to be an adult who is still seen as her most famous character--who happens to be an eight-year-old.

I don't know if I can even describe how I felt reading this book. It only took me a day to read, and had me in tears several times. Wilson is only a year older than me, and I could see myself in her, so I understood the world she was talking about. I may never have become a child star, but that is such a small part of who she is.

I remember going to see Matilda in theaters for a friend's birthday party (I had to leave during the cake eating part because it made me feel sick). And then, I have to be honest, I hadn't really thought about Wilson after that. Until I started listening to Welcome to Night Vale, a strange podcast where she has a small recurring role. Then I started following her on Twitter, and she's funny and smart and down to earth. So all of that kind of sparked my interest, and the book was definitely something I felt like I needed to read.

I'm glad I did. I like knowing about people, what makes them tick, why they are the way they are. Wilson opened up pieces of her life in this book, including her struggle with mental health, the openness of which is something that I appreciate. Each essay is like glimpsing through a window of Wilson's life-house, going from childhood, teenage years, and adult at different times, focusing on different things. It was a refreshing way to read a person's memoirs, instead of strictly chronologically. Wilson's openness and honesty were sincere and endearing.

There is some strong language and sexual references.

*I do not receive compensations from Amazon.